November 24, 2014

Did somebody say hibernation?

Just a short note to let you know that The Book Garden will be in hibernation until March 2015. There will be the odd post here or there (two more scheduled this week) and I will be participating in some giveaway hops during that time, so stick around folks and see you all again in full swing next spring!

Source

November 21, 2014

Non-Fiction Friday - Liquid Intelligence

Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail
(Dave Arnold)
November 21st 2014, W. W. Norton & Company


In Dave Arnold’s world, the shape of an ice cube, the sugars and acids in an apple, and the bubbles in a bottle of champagne are all ingredients to be measured, tested, and tweaked.
With Liquid Intelligence, the creative force at work in Booker & Dax, New York City’s high-tech bar, brings readers behind the counter and into the lab. There, Arnold and his collaborators investigate temperature, carbonation, sugar concentration, and acidity in search of ways to enhance classic cocktails and invent new ones that revolutionize your expectations about what a drink can look and taste like.
Years of rigorous experimentation and study—botched attempts and inspired solutions—have yielded the recipes and techniques found in these pages. Featuring more than 120 recipes and nearly 450 color photographs, Liquid Intelligence begins with the simple—how ice forms and how to make crystal-clear cubes in your own freezer—and then progresses into advanced techniques like clarifying cloudy lime juice with enzymes, nitro-muddling fresh basil to prevent browning, and infusing vodka with coffee, orange, or peppercorns.
Practical tips for preparing drinks by the pitcher, making homemade sodas, and building a specialized bar in your own home are exactly what drink enthusiasts need to know. For devotees seeking the cutting edge, chapters on liquid nitrogen, chitosan/gellan washing, and the applications of a centrifuge expand the boundaries of traditional cocktail craft.
Arnold’s book is the beginning of a new method of making drinks, a problem-solving approach grounded in attentive observation and creative techniques. Readers will learn how to extract the sweet flavor of peppers without the spice, why bottling certain drinks beforehand beats shaking them at the bar, and why quinine powder and succinic acid lead to the perfect gin and tonic.
Liquid Intelligence is about satisfying your curiosity and refining your technique, from red-hot pokers to the elegance of an old-fashioned. Whether you’re in search of astounding drinks or a one-of-a-kind journey into the next generation of cocktail making, Liquid Intelligence is the ultimate standard—one that no bartender or drink enthusiast should be without.

November 19, 2014

Funny photos? Photo fun(ia).

Downtime between meetings? Slight case of boredom? Or maybe in actual need of, say, a profile pic for a social media site of your choice? I think I have just the thing you need then.

PhotoFunia allows you to create amazing photo collages and spruce up your pictures with different effects in seconds and for absolutely free. Who could ask for more? What's that? Book related, you're saying? Now would I be blogging about this if that weren't one of the many options you are offered? *shakes head in disbelieve*

Here's one of my favorite selfies from way back when ... if you ask me, the combination "me + old book" totally rocks!



Were you already familiar with PhotoFunia? Which of the many effects would you choose for a profile picture or just to generally play around with? 

November 17, 2014

Monday Five's - Why I'd rather read on a Kindle than a physical book! (Part II)

Last week I let you in on why I prefer to hold an actual book in my hands, the kind that trees had to die for. While my reasons for this more traditional approach to reading described in Part I are something not easily surpassed by an eReader, these sleek gadgets do have a thing or two going for them too. I guess what it all boils down to is that I do like them both, each for different reasons. Now why is that? Here are my main reasons why eReading rocks.


I
The storage of a gazillion books that don't take up any physical space.

II
The ease with which you can read 1.200+ pages monster tomes.

III
The gratification of instant downloads.

IV
The option to change font sizes.

V
The forests that don't get chopped down to make books.*
*Though, admittedly, I have no clue how "environmentally friendly" the production of an eReader is.

Do you prefer reading on an eReader or are you a die-hard fan of physical books? What advantages do you appreciate about a Kindle or Nook? And if you had to choose to only read physical books or eBooks, which would you go for? Please share!

November 15, 2014

Gratitude Giveaways (Open WW)


Welcome to the Gratitude Giveaways (November 15th - 30th)

How about showing your love for literature by sending a bookish postcard to friends and family? To get you started I'm giving away the winner's choice of one of these boxed postcard collections from Penguin.

100 Book Covers in One Box
100 Writers in One Box
Please note: This giveaway is open worldwide, but only for countries TBD offers free shipping to - please check here.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

November 14, 2014

Non-Fiction Friday - Come Home at Once

Come Home at Once
(Guy Atkins)
November 13th 2014, Bantam Press


For more than a decade, Guy Atkins has collected postcards sent by the Edwardians. In this incredible treasury of 100 cards, he shares the very best from his collection. From the tantalising, to the hilarious, to the downright shocking, this compendium shines a light on an extraordinary phenomenon of communication.
At half the price of sending a letter, and with same-day delivery in urban areas, Britain became obsessed with the postcard between 1902 and 1914. By the outbreak of the First World War, the Post Office was delivering close to a billion cards a year. In fact, the speedy delivery meant Edwardian postcards were the text messages of their day!
Come Home at Once presents an intriguing piece of social history. In it, Guy explains just what made the postcard such an Edwardian sensation, what it really meant to tilt your stamp and how same-day delivery made Edwardian postcards completely different from the postcards we know today.